Young Drivers Insurance tips

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The cost of car insurance for under-25s is eye-wateringly high and expected to continue to rise. The average cost for a 17-22-year-old is already over £1,400/yr. However, you can cut costs.

This is a step-by-step guide to young drivers’ car insurance, helping you compare more than 100 providers in minutes, with specialised tricks, and dos and don’ts to save every spare penny.If you’re aged over 25 check our main Car Insurance guide for more.

How to buy car insurance

1: Get quotes from the top comparison sites 

Firstly, visit the comparison sites as these zip your details off to a number of insurers’ and brokers’ websites to find the cheapest quotes. As no single site captures the entire market and prices vary, combining a number of sites is the best way to make a saving. It’s best to use all four, but if you don’t have time, we’ve ranked them in order of the sites that most often return the cheapest quotes so you’ve the best chance of bagging the top deal.

2: Get quotes from insurers that comparisons miss

Comparison sites let you compare 100s of insurers quickly but they don’t capture the entire market as some large competitive insurers only offer their products directly. 

So benchmark your cheapest comparison quotes against prices offered by the following insurers that you won’t find unless you go direct

 2: Get quotes from insurers that comparisons miss

Comparison sites let you compare 100s of insurers quickly but they don’t capture the entire market as some large competitive insurers only offer their products directly. 

So benchmark your cheapest comparison quotes against prices offered by the following insurers that you won’t find unless you go direct

4: Try specialist policies

Once you’ve tried the comparison sites, it’s time to check specialist young driver policies to see if they undercut them. If you are a careful driver who doesn’t cover many miles and drives during off-peak hours, you could see a reduction in the premium.

5: Cashback, discounts & haggling

By now you’ll know the cheapest provider, yet you may be able to cut the cost even further. The list below takes you through a variety of options to improve your deal.

Cashback websites

These sites carry paid links from some retailers and financial services providers; in other words, if you click through them and get a product, they get paid. They then give you some of this cash which means you get the same product, but a cut of its revenue.

Don’t choose based only on cashback, see it as a bonus once you’ve picked the right cover.

Things you need to know before doing this.

  • Never count the cash as yours until it’s in your bank account. This cashback is never 100% guaranteed, there can be issues with tracking and allocating the payment, plus many cashback sites are small companies with limited backing, and you’ve no protection if anything happens to them.
  • Withdraw the cashback as soon as you’re allowed. Money held in your cashback site account has no protection at all if that company goes bust, so always withdraw it as soon as you’re eligible.
  • Clear your cookies. While it shouldn’t be a problem, if you’ve used comparison sites beforehand, there is a minor risk that the cashback may not track due to cookies – so it’s good practice to clear those first (read About Cookies).

Haggle on your car insurance

The car insurance market is very competitive and companies are desperate to retain business – but never just auto-renew.

Insurers love auto-renewing, as it’s a fine for apathy where they hoick the premium knowing you’ll pay. If a policy has automatically renewed, getting out of it usually means charges and fees, so don’t get caught out.

Once you’ve got your overall cheapest price, get on the phone and try to haggle as your renewal is a starting point. There’s often massive price flexibility, but be fully armed with the screen scrapers’ cheapest quotes and any available cashback first.

The first port of call should be your existing insurer. If it can beat or even match the best quote it saves the hassle of switching policy. If that doesn’t work and you’re still in the mood, take it to a broker. For more haggling tips, read the full Haggle On The High Street guide and The top 10 firms to haggle with.

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